Week Eleven: MA Project

Updated: May 2

During a webinar with Ben before the Easter break, he mentioned that I should refine my question even more as I was straddling two different topics, packaging and teaching. Although both topics interest me I decided to refine my question toward teaching. With that in mind and considering my research so far I edited my question to:


How can we use traditional teaching methods and approaches within education on plastic pollution?

I thought it would be a good idea at this point to summarise my research so far and look at the important points (I feel) that will help with designing.

Materials


Through researching Bruno Munari I have come to learn, even more so, about the importance of materials, especially when designing for children. There's a freedom to engage with all the senses when designing for children.

With this particualr project, there's also an importance of connectivity with nature. Although, ideally, this would involve physically egaging with nature through outdoor persuits, there are other ways this can be achieved through the materials we choose to design with. An urban school might not have the luxury of simply taking a short walk to a beach or forest, yet these experiences, although somewhat diluted, can be brought into the classroom through different a different guise.

Pedegogy


When it comes down to what style/approach/method of teaching is most effective when it comes to acheieving results my research has shown that learning through doing/play generates the best results. Jean Jaques Rosseau's book Émile was a bit of a game changer for me in this regard, as it also pointed out the importance of allowing the child to learn through play and the enjoyment of aquiring knowledge at their own pace without knowledge being thrust upon them so early; giving the child the tools to aquire knowledge.


Image: https://www.instagram.com/p/BvMYTQBFOpz/


Games and Discussions


0-3 years

Act out the animal: students take turns to the roll the dice, everyone acts out the animal it lands on.

Animal sounds: students take turns rolling the dice, everyone makes the animal sound of the animal it lands on.

Roll and draw: students take turns rolling the dice, everyone draws the animal it lands on.

Roll, roll, run!: students take turns rolling the dice, everyone acts out the animal it lands on unless it's the tiger, then students should run and sit down. The last student to sit down is out.

4-6 years

Roll, roll, run!: students take turns rolling the dice, everyone acts out the animal it lands on unless it's the tiger, then students should run and sit down. The last student to sit down is out.

Roll and draw: students take turns rolling the dice, everyone draws the animal it lands on within a time limit.

Animal charades: students take turns rolling the dice and acting out the animal it lands on. The first student to guess correctly is next to play.

Match the animal to the habitat

Students sit in a circle and one student rolls the animal dice. Students then need to match the habitat to the animal the dice landed on by rolling the habitat dice.

Animal/habitat memory

Students go round in a circle rolling the animal/habitat dice. They must remember all the animals/habitats that have been rolled before them.

12-15 years

Roll and discuss: students take turns rolling the dice and let the outcomes guide your discussion. Some initial discussion points below:

  • How do you think (location) will look in (years)?

Roll a scenario: students roll the dice to help create a scenario in which they must navigate through to enable a positive outcome. Some initial ideas to build on are listed below:

  • You're stuck in (location) , how do you survive?

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